Archives: space

Time–space compression (also known as space–time compression and time–space distantiation), first articulated in 1989 by geographer David Harvey in The Condition of Postmodernity,[1] refers to any phenomenon that alters the qualities of and relationship between space and time. A similar idea was proposed by Elmar Alvater in an article in Prokla in 1987 translated into English as Ecological and Economic Modalities of Time and Space and published in Capitalism Nature Socialism, 1(3) in 1989.
Time–space compression often occurs as a result of technological innovations that condense or elide spatial and temporal distances, including technologies of communication (telegraph, telephones, fax machines, Internet), travel (rail, cars, trains, jets), and economics (the need to overcome spatial barriers, open up new markets, speed up production cycles, and reduce the turnover time of capital). According to theorists like Paul Virilio, time-space compression is an essential facet of contemporary life: “Today we are entering a space which is speed-space … This new other time is that of electronic transmission, of high-tech machines, and therefore, man is present in this sort of time, not via his physical presence, but via programming” (qtd. in Decron 71[2]). Virilio also uses the term dromology to describe “speed-space.”

Push the Envelope

Push the Envelope

What would it be like to travel into space, knowing that those before you had just been killed in the process? The Right Stuff  has a compelling way of asking this question with the engaging wit and historical awareness you would expect from a documentary-type drama. This film is an impressive look at what the world’s space race was like through the lives of supersonic test pilot Chuck Yeager and the astronauts of the Mercury 7 team. These were the first Americans to experience spaceflight.

Here you can find an Oral History of The Right Stuff.

Spacewalker

Spacewalker

Ed White, First American Spacewalker – On June 3, 1965 Edward H. White II became the first American to step outside his spacecraft and let go, effectively setting himself adrift in the zero gravity of space. For 23 minutes White floated and maneuvered himself around the Gemini spacecraft while logging 6500 miles during his orbital stroll. White was attached to the spacecraft by a 25 foot umbilical line and a 23-ft. tether line, both wrapped in gold tape to form one cord. In his right hand White carries a Hand Held Self Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU) which is used to move about the weightless environment of space. The visor of his helmet is gold plated to protect him from the unfiltered rays of the sun.

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