Archives: Photo & Design

Wall-e

Having just watched 2001: A Space Odyssey, I realize how many shout outs this film receives from other movies. I was watching Wall-E with the little brother and it took on a whole new level of meaning in the wake of 2001.

Wall-E - REIMAGES

2001: A Space Odyssey

2001: A Space Odyssey

I was delightfully impressed by the visuals in 2001. I loved simply looking at this movie. The content and plot flow was a head scratcher that I enjoyed playfully poking fun at while seriously pondering it’s intent and message. I collected a few movie posters, fan art pieces, and screenshots because it is just that great to look at.

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001space4

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

2001 Space Odyssey - REIMAGES

Clyde Kilby’s Resolutions to Staying Alive

Clyde Kilby’s Resolutions to Staying Alive

1. At least once every day I shall look steadily up at the sky and remember that I, a consciousness with a conscience, am on a planet traveling in space with wonderfully mysterious things above and about me.

Interstellar - REIMAGES

Illustration by Marie Bergeron

 

2. Instead of the accustomed idea of a mindless and endless evolutionary change to which we can neither add nor subtract, I shall suppose the universe guided by an intelligence which, as Aristotle said of Greek drama, requires a beginning, middle, and an end. I think this will save me from the cynicism expressed by Bernard Russell before his death, when he said: “there is a darkness without, and when I die there will be a darkness within. There is no splendor, no vastness anywhere, only triviality for a moment, and then nothing.”

3. I shall not fall into the falsehood that this day, or any day, is merely another ambiguous and plodding 24 hours, but rather a unique event, filled, if I so wish, with worthy potentialities. I shall not be fool enough to suppose that trouble and pain are wholly evil parentheses in my existence but, just as likely, ladders to be climbed toward moral and spiritual manhood.

Tree of Life

The Tree of Life

4. I shall not turn my life into a thin straight line which prefers abstractions to reality. I shall know what I am doing when I abstract, which of course I shall often have to do.

5. I shall not demean my own uniqueness by envy of others. I shall stop boring into myself to discover what psychological or social categories I might belong to. Mostly I shall simply forget about myself and do my work.

6. I shall open my eyes and ears. Once every day I shall simply stare at a tree, a flower, a cloud or a person. I shall not then be concerned at all to ask what they are, but simply be glad that they are. I shall joyfully allow them the mystery of what Lewis calls their “divine, magical, terrifying, and ecstatic” existence.

7. I shall follow Darwin’s advice and turn frequently to imaginative things such as good literature and good music, preferably, as Lewis suggests, an old book and timeless music.

Concert - REIMAGES

San Diego, CA

8. I shall not allow the devilish onrush of this century to usurp all my energies but will instead, as Charles Williams suggested, “fulfill the moment as the moment.” I shall try to live well just now because the only time that exists is now.

9. If for nothing more than the sake of a change of view, I shall assume my ancestry to be from the heavens rather than from the caves.

10. Even if I turn out to be wrong, I shall bet my life on the assumption that this world is not idiotic, neither run by an absentee landlord, but that today, this very day, some stroke is being added to the cosmic canvas that in due course I shall understand with joy as a stroke made by the Architect who calls himself Alpha and Omega.

11. I shall sometimes look back at the freshness of vision I had in childhood and try, atleast for a little while, to be, in the words of Lewis Carroll, the ‘child of pure unclouded brow, and dreaming eyes of wonder.’

 

Clyde Samuel Kilby (1902 – 1986) was an American author and English professor, best known for his scholarship on the Inklings, especially J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. A professor at Wheaton College (Illinois) for most of his life, Dr. Kilby founded the Marion E. Wade Center there, making it a center for the study of the Inklings, their friends (such as Dorothy Sayers), and their influences (such as George MacDonald).

Wanderers - a short film by Erik Wernquist from Erik Wernquist on Vimeo.

Endeavor

Breathtaking.

There is something about the reality of outer space that demands mad feels. It puts a person in their place, all the while inviting them to endeavor beyond what is known. It taps into the potential of humanity while making declarations of our frailty and great need.

Outer space is so… other-than. It pushes past the limits of what we think we’ve comprehended, reminding humanity that it is at the mercy of something greater. Yet, that greatness wants to be known. It must be known.

And we keep endeavoring to know. This film charms its viewers with hopefulness. More exploration is on the horizon.

Watch Wanderers.

HE>I

HE>I

“In the book Cosmos, Dr. Carl Sagan, the late astrophysicist from Cornell University, made the statement that as science seeks to understand the universe, it proceeds on the assumption that the world is cosmos, not chaos. He was saying that if the external universe were ultimately chaos, it would be impossible to know anything about it, because ultimate chaos is irrational and therefore unintelligible. So, the metaphysical assumption of all scientific inquiry is that the universe is inherently knowable and intelligible, and for it to be knowable and intelligible, it must ultimately be ordered. It must be cosmos, not chaos.”

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Spacewalker

Spacewalker

Ed White, First American Spacewalker – On June 3, 1965 Edward H. White II became the first American to step outside his spacecraft and let go, effectively setting himself adrift in the zero gravity of space. For 23 minutes White floated and maneuvered himself around the Gemini spacecraft while logging 6500 miles during his orbital stroll. White was attached to the spacecraft by a 25 foot umbilical line and a 23-ft. tether line, both wrapped in gold tape to form one cord. In his right hand White carries a Hand Held Self Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU) which is used to move about the weightless environment of space. The visor of his helmet is gold plated to protect him from the unfiltered rays of the sun.

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